herbgardening:

hippie-galaxy:

This is perfect.

YES

herbgardening:

hippie-galaxy:

This is perfect.

YES

(Source: treerings-sing, via buckyoubucky)

exgynocraticgrrl:

They talk about pornography as a form of fantasy. They actually talk about prostitution as if it were an exercise in fantasy. And it is a part of the pornographers’ effort to hide what they really do in real life, to encourage the use of the word fantasy in place of actual behaviors that really happen, in the real world.

A fantasy is something that happens in your head. It doesn’t go past your head. Once you have somebody acting out whatever that scenario might be in your head, it is an act in the world, it is real. It is real behavior with real consequences to real people.

And so it has been a very brilliant part of the pornographers’ propaganda campaign to protect pornography to characterize the industry as an industry of fantasy…It has nothing whatsoever to do with fantasy, it has to do with a human being actually having happen to them what we see as happen[ing] to them.

And I think it’s just the most extraordinary insult to the human conscience to continue to characterize these real acts to real people as if they only exist in the head of the male consumer. And what that means is his head, his psychology, is more important than her life.

"They call it fantasy," - Andrea Dworkin

(via gennell)

Resources for Male Survivors

letstalkaboutrape:

I posted last week asking people if they knew of some good resources for male victims of sexual assault. Here is the list people came up with:

www.malesurvivor.org

www.violenceunsilenced.com

www.rainn.org

www.pandys.org

www.1in6.org

www.soulspeakout.org

Thanks everyone!

(via sourcedumal)

deducingbbcsherlock:

Q: Why does that character have to be gay/bi/black/Asian/Hispanic/etc?

A: As opposed to what?

I’ve found this to be a useful response, because many people will hesitate before saying “white” or “straight.” That hesitation comes from the realization, however…

notquitephil:

invertedgender:

calling a man a “pig” is literally dehumanising how do some people not think there’s anything wrong with that how

Because chicks, fillies, birds and bitches never get dehumanised. Those vixens always get away with this kind of shit. Especially the heifers, they’re the worst. What cows.

(Source: toxicnebulae, via buckyoubucky)

buckyoubucky:

vibraniumbaby, blackwinged-winter
Okay so I have some criticisms that are both just kinda like practical criticisms and then social criticisms
So the biggest social criticism is this:
for a tale that is a giant metaphor or whatever for racism, there are so may white people. Like the cast, even the extras, was 95% white, with 4% black, and 1% Other. Like the lack of diversity. Like the main group of humans, the one black guy was literally the Token Black Guy.
out of the whole movie, there are a grand total of two women (three if you count the close-up of the one woman as they were getting ready for battle), and one of those women was an ape. like there were a lot of women in the background, yes, but two women. one of them was a cgi ape. two. only one of them was actually real. so one woman. WOW.
like this might be nitpicky but they hinted quite heavily at the kid having ptsd buuuuuuuuuuut that was literally never brought up again? the kid actually was pretty well adjusted for the rest of the movie after they mentioned the horrors he’s seen? so i just kinda question-marked at that.
let’s go back to the two women, one of which wasn’t even real. TWO. WOMEN. ONLY ONE WAS REAL. WOW. 
i’m still really stuck on “two women”
and also, at one point in the movie the main human group is running for their lives and like…two members of the group, the black one included, practically disappear and are never seen again or mentioned??? like i might be forgetting something but like those two completely disappeared???? and then at the end there was just…no resolution with the chick and the kid??? i was actually really annoyed that they were left behind idk????
two women
those are my biggest crticisms for the movie.

buckyoubucky:

vibraniumbaby, blackwinged-winter

Okay so I have some criticisms that are both just kinda like practical criticisms and then social criticisms

So the biggest social criticism is this:

  • for a tale that is a giant metaphor or whatever for racism, there are so may white people. Like the cast, even the extras, was 95% white, with 4% black, and 1% Other. Like the lack of diversity. Like the main group of humans, the one black guy was literally the Token Black Guy.
  • out of the whole movie, there are a grand total of two women (three if you count the close-up of the one woman as they were getting ready for battle), and one of those women was an ape. like there were a lot of women in the background, yes, but two women. one of them was a cgi ape. two. only one of them was actually real. so one woman. WOW.
  • like this might be nitpicky but they hinted quite heavily at the kid having ptsd buuuuuuuuuuut that was literally never brought up again? the kid actually was pretty well adjusted for the rest of the movie after they mentioned the horrors he’s seen? so i just kinda question-marked at that.
  • let’s go back to the two women, one of which wasn’t even real. TWO. WOMEN. ONLY ONE WAS REAL. WOW. 
  • i’m still really stuck on “two women”
  • and also, at one point in the movie the main human group is running for their lives and like…two members of the group, the black one included, practically disappear and are never seen again or mentioned??? like i might be forgetting something but like those two completely disappeared???? and then at the end there was just…no resolution with the chick and the kid??? i was actually really annoyed that they were left behind idk????
  • two women

those are my biggest crticisms for the movie.

pervocracy:

postwhitesociety:

hm

I think the “women are mysterious” thing can also come from:
1) Women actually being quite clear, but not telling men what they want to hear.  ”She said she doesn’t want to talk to me?  So many mixed messages and confusing signals!”
2) Women not having cheat codes.  ”I tried being nice, and she didn’t have sex with me.  I tried being an asshole, and she didn’t have sex with me.  Come on, there’s got to be some kind of solution to this puzzle!”
3) Women not being a hive mind.  ”First a woman told me that she likes guys with big muscles.  Then the very next day a woman told me she thinks muscles aren’t attractive at all.  Make up your mind, women!”
4) An individual woman doing something confusing, and instead of asking “why is she doing this now?” men ask “why do women always do this?”

pervocracy:

postwhitesociety:

hm

I think the “women are mysterious” thing can also come from:

1) Women actually being quite clear, but not telling men what they want to hear.  ”She said she doesn’t want to talk to me?  So many mixed messages and confusing signals!”

2) Women not having cheat codes.  ”I tried being nice, and she didn’t have sex with me.  I tried being an asshole, and she didn’t have sex with me.  Come on, there’s got to be some kind of solution to this puzzle!”

3) Women not being a hive mind.  ”First a woman told me that she likes guys with big muscles.  Then the very next day a woman told me she thinks muscles aren’t attractive at all.  Make up your mind, women!”

4) An individual woman doing something confusing, and instead of asking “why is she doing this now?” men ask “why do women always do this?”

(Source: ethiopienne, via womenorgnow)

nativnuance:

fandomheroin:

You can be any character in the world…as long as you’re white.

  • They can never find ethnic actors…until they need maids, slaves, thugs, victims, extras, dropouts, villains. Even in fictional universes we get lightened, pushed to the background, vilified, or exaggerated. That’s IF we even make it to the movie. 
  • We don’t even get to tell our own cultural stories. 
  • Yet there will never be a black James Bond

Your imagination has been limited by whiteness and the norms it perpetuates. Don’t accept appropriation, don’t accept racism, and don’t give power to those who do by paying to see their movies.

(via sourcedumal)

gradientlair:

#NotJustHello is a recent Twitter dialogue (started by @Karnythia) on how street harassment is not just about men not being able to say “hello” to women (though all who experience street harassment aren’t necessarily “women” or ID as such). Above are some of my tweets during that conversation. The idea that it is women “preventing” hello is not just a violently gross lie, but a mass oversimplification of the verbal/physical abuse and even sexual assault/murder that comes about via street harassment. 

Anyone who thinks all I describe above is okay clearly supports violence. None of these actions (and I’ve experienced much worse; some I don’t even discuss online) above are about saying “hello.” It’s one of the reasons why I included "so I can’t say hello?" in my Street Harassment and Street Harassment + Misogynoir BINGO card, that I included again in this post.

The first time I posted the BINGO card is in my recent post about my experiences, my writing on street harassment as experienced as a Black woman and the anti-street harassment chat #YouOkSis (by @Russian_Starr and @FeministaJonesscheduled for Thursday, July 10th at 12pm. In this aforementioned post (and within my years of writing on the topic) I address why some people want Black women silenced on this topic (and in general) and how the racist and anti-intersectional mainstream media framing and centering of White women as the only victims of street harassment with Black men as only perpetrators removes other men’s culpability and again, silences Black women. This is a time and space for Black women to speak our truths.

Related Post: Street Harassment Is Violence (Essay Compilation)

(via kyssthis16)

"Ancient moon priestesses were called virgins. ‘Virgin’ meant not married, not belonging to a man - a woman who was ‘one-in-herself’. The very word derives from a Latin root meaning strength, force, skill; and was later applied to men: virle. Ishtar, Diana, Astarte, Isis were all all called virgin, which did not refer to sexual chastity, but sexual independence. And all great culture heroes of the past, mythic or historic, were said to be born of virgin mothers: Marduk, Gilgamesh, Buddha, Osiris, Dionysus, Genghis Khan, Jesus - they were all affirmed as sons of the Great Mother, of the Original One, their worldly power deriving from her. When the Hebrews used the word, and in the original Aramaic, it meant ‘maiden’ or ‘young woman’, with no connotations to sexual chastity. But later Christian translators could not conceive of the ‘Virgin Mary’ as a woman of independent sexuality, needless to say; they distorted the meaning into sexually pure, chaste, never touched."

Monica Sjoo, The Great Cosmic Mother: Rediscovering the Religion of the Earth  (via thewaking)

Literally the most important thing you will read today.

(via aesrettibeht)

#staywoke

(via diokpara)

(Source: ynannarising, via buckyoubucky)